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24th Nov 2022 Joe Williams

GambleAware has today published the annual statistics for the National Gambling Treatment Service (NGTS) 2021-22

The Annual Statistics saw most people (92%) who completed their scheduled treatment improve their harmful gambling behaviour

National treatment service continues to provide fast and effective support for those harmed by gambling

  • The National Gambling Treatment Service (NGTS) Annual Statistics for 2021/22 saw most people who completed their scheduled treatment improve their harmful gambling behaviour (92%) and psychological wellbeing surrounding their gambling (86%).    
  • Among clients who ended treatment in 2021/22, a majority (63%) completed their scheduled treatment. 
  • 50% of clients had a first appointment within five days of contacting the NGTS, and 75% within 12 days. 

GambleAware has today published the annual statistics for the National Gambling Treatment Service (NGTS) for 2021/22. The report shows NGTS continues to be a fast and effective route for those experiencing gambling harms to improve their gambling behaviour and psychological distress.

Commissioned by GambleAware, the NGTS is a network of organisations that provide confidential treatment and support for anyone experiencing gambling-related harms in England, Scotland and Wales, including GamCare and its partner network, Gordon Moody and NHS  treatment centres . It is free to access and provides telephone, online and face-to-face support for individuals and groups.

The new report shows 7,072 people received treatment between April 2021 and March 20221. Most people (92%) who completed their scheduled treatment showed improvement on their Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI) score, a widely used measure of harmful gambling behaviour2.

Most people (86%) who completed treatment also reduced psychological distress around their gambling behaviour, measured using the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation (Core-10) measure3. Just under one third (30%) did not complete their treatment.

Zoë Osmond, CEO of GambleAware, said: “It is extremely encouraging to see that the National Gambling Treatment Service continues to improve the lives of those who experience gambling harms and remains a highly effective treatment option.

"It is also encouraging to see the fall in those accessing more advanced treatment balanced out with more and more people accessing the helpline and other services as a means of support. Gambling harms can affect anyone and it is important to encourage people to seek support and treatment early on. 
 
We remain committed to ensuring that we work closely with our partners to understand how we can further optimise uptake and retention. We also acknowledge the urgent need to raise awareness of the service and improve access to it across the diverse range of populations and people that could stand to benefit from treatment”.

Most referrals were found to be from the National Gambling Helpline (57%), with self-made referrals making up just over one quarter (26%). Half of all service users (50%) had a first appointment within five days of contacting the NGTS, and 75% within 12 days. Treatment was shown to last on average ten weeks. 

The report also shed light on the evolving picture of gambling harms as a public health concern. Data revealed the most common location for gambling amongst service users was online, with use of these services noticeably higher among younger age groups. An increasing number of women were also found to be contacting the service, with the majority reaching out being ‘affected others’, who across both men and women represented 14% of those contacting the service.

The report also shed light on the evolving picture of gambling harms as a public health concern. Data revealed the most common location for gambling amongst service users was online, with use of these services noticeably higher among younger age groups.

An increasing number of women were also found to be contacting the service, with the majority reaching out being ‘affected others’, who across both men and women represented 14% of those contacting the service.

GambleAware is committed to tackling gambling harms as a public health issue. The National Gambling Treatment Service is a collaboration of several organisations including GamCare, Gordon Moody and the Primary Care Gambling Service, working together to provide confidential treatment and support for anyone experiencing gambling harms.

Those wanting to receive help or support for themselves or others can contact the National Gambling Helpline on 0808 8020 133. The service is free, confidential, and open 24 hours a day.

Download the annual report which is also available in Welsh. 

Notes to Editors:

  • The report does not include National Gambling Helpline figures, and only references those in structured treatment delivered by the National Gambling Treatment Service.
  • The PGSI is the most widely used measure of problem gambling behaviour in Great Britain. It consists of nine items and each item is assessed on a four-point scale: never, sometimes, most of the time, almost always.
  • The CORE outcome measure (CORE-10) is a session by session monitoring tool with items covering anxiety, depression, trauma, physical problems, functioning and risk to self. The measure has six high intensity/ severity and four low intensity/ severity items.
  • Funding for NHS treatment centres ended in March 2022.

About GambleAware

  • GambleAware is the leading charity (Charity No. England & Wales 1093910, Scotland SC049433) working to keep people safe from gambling harms. We do this by leading public health campaigns, education programmes and driving the transformation of treatment and prevention services. 
  • Every year we fund access to free, confidential treatment for nearly 12,000 people and over 41,000 calls to the National Gambling Helpline. 
  • GambleAware is an independent charity, accountable to the Charity Commission, with an extremely robust system of governance processes in place. The majority of our Board of trustees are leaders within the NHS and public health sector. 
  • We work in close collaboration with the NHS, clinicians, local and national government, gambling treatment providers, as well as other services like mental health, substance misuse and criminal justice, to ensure that the whole system works together to help people suffering from gambling harms. 
  • Our research shows that one in 10 people who gamble are at risk of experiencing gambling harms. Gambling can harm people and their families financially, psychologically and physically. GambleAware works in close collaboration with leading organisations and experts including the NHS, government, local authorities and gambling treatment providers, to ensure that people get the information, support and treatment they need. 
  • GambleAware is a commissioner of independent evidence-informed prevention and treatment services in partnership with expert organisations and agencies across Great Britain, with over £56 million of funding under active management.